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Honey Bread Rolls

I used some of my long-term food storage to bake honey bread rolls. This recipe is from Augason Farms Honey White Bread & Roll can. I generally followed the small recipe off the back of the Augason can.

Augason Bread Rolls

Here are my preparation notes for making the Augason bread rolls:

Used ½ cup of water to proof 1-1/2 tsp of dry yeast with small amount of sugar
Used 2 tb-spoons of olive oil
Used 2 cups of flour from can plus a more flour added as needed
Added more water, probably another ¼ cup to bring up to ¾ cups+ total
Kneaded dough for 5 mins approx (by hand)
Divided into 9 balls and placed in well greased 12×12 baking pan
Put in oven with light on and covered with tea towel
I let dough rise for 1.5 hours before baking
Bake at 400 degrees for approx 13-14 minutes until light brown. Top with a little butter
Yield: 9 small rolls

Here is a photo of the nine bread rolls prepared and ready to rise before baking. Continue Reading →

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Cooked Whole Wheat

In an effort to use and try out my long-term storage food, I cooked whole wheat this week. This wheat is hard red from a #10 can I bought over 10 years ago. It was never opened until now and the wheat is hard, dry and looks just as good as the day it was canned.

I rinsed and sorted through the wheat kernels before cooking. I opted to use the slow cooker (crock pot) method. I used 1 cup of wheat kernels along with 2-1/2 cups of water with a half teaspoon of salt. I placed all this in my crock pot on low overnight. It may of overcooked as my wheat berries were dried out a bit. It was cooking for about 10 hours which was probably too long.

Cooked Whole Wheat

I tried it as straight hot cereal as the recipe states. I added a bit of milk and sugar to a small bowel. I personally didn’t care for it. But then I tried it by adding a tablespoon to my regular cold cereal with milk and I loved it.

I put the remaining cooked wheat in a jar and refrigerated it. I have been using it daily with my cold cereal and have really enjoyed it.

I had read that it is also a great meat extender. So I added a big spoonful of cooked wheat to my last batch of ground hamburger chili as a test. The results were great and no one even noticed and the chili tasted just fine.

So next time you need a meat extender, you should try using some cooked storage wheat. It was a pleasant surprise and now I know that it is useful and tasteful too. Plus it is important to know how to cook and use your storage food successfully.

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Simmering Meat on the Woodstove

I love using the woodstove for cooking. It is just a wonderful feeling knowing it doesn’t use any electricity and is an old trait going back to times gone by. I know that sounds corny. But this is such an useful idea and a great skill to know how to do. Maybe I should say, this is an idea that you should know that you can do. It is very easy and just something that you can do if the power is out and you need to cook on other than a range top.

This is just some leftover roast beef that I cut up and added to a large saucepan. Add some broth and let it simmer. I place my pot on the top corner of the stove and watch that it isn’t too hot. You want it to just simmer. I usually let it simmer for several hours and the broth cooks down. Eventually you end up with pieces of beef that are just fall-apart super tender. I have done this several times and it just makes the most tender pieces of beef to add to a stew, soup, shepherd’s pie, or other recipes.

Why not test out this useful idea and hone your skills for cooking on a woodstove? It is a practical, handy way to cook without a traditional range.

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Tomatoes Wintered Over

I pulled all my green tomatoes in Mid October right before it frosted real hard. I put them in a box wrapped in newspaper and put them in the basement. I have done this for several years now and this method works pretty good for preserving and saving the green tomatoes for use later.

This photo is of a few of my tomatoes that I am still pulling out of the box this week for use. Some are a bit wrinkled but they sure taste much better than those store-bought plastic tasting tomatoes that you get at the store this time of year.

A few tips if you try this wintering over idea. Check the tomatoes frequently to remove any overripe or spoiling tomatoes from your storage box or bag. I normally just cut off the bad part if any and use the remaining tomato in making sauces or condiments. Also make sure you keep the box or bag in a cool, dry and dark basement or area for storage. I found this works best. This year I used long, low boxes which I found worked out very well for the tomatoes to be stored. If you stack tomatoes on top of each other they tend to spoil faster in my opinion. Use newspaper to wrap them separately as this helps extend the wintering over process.

It truly is enjoyable to eat my own fresh tomatoes in January from last year’s garden. I plan to expand on this wintered over tomato idea again this year.

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Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas and time for some final thoughts for 2022. It has been a challenging year in many ways. Prices are up, supply has been down on many things, and there is a lot of divisive, mean-spirited stuff out there these days. But as we near Christmas, I want to share with you a special greeting.

Snoopy Christmas Hug

So my year-end useful idea to share is love. May you and your loved ones be blessed with peace and love during this most special time of the year.

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Harvesting Radish Seeds

Have you ever wondered how to harvest radish seeds from your radish plants? Many times my radishes bolt and go to seed but I had never tried to harvest the seeds for future use. This year I had several radish plants that bolted so I set out to harvest the seeds for next year’s radish plantings.

Radishes Gone to Seed with Pods

After the radish plants go to seed, they later develop these green pods which is where the radish seeds form. You have to let the pods grow and then dry them out to be able to harvest the little seeds inside. Here is a photo of a big bunch of radishes with the pods drying. It works well to cut the vines with the pods attached and leave them out in the sun to dry out.

The pods turn white in color and are hard when ready to harvest the seeds as shown in this next photo.
Radish Seeds in Pods

Here is a photo of just some of the seeds I collected from the radish pods I harvested.
Harvested Radish Seeds

It is a slow process to open the pods and collect the seeds. I found it works well to put the vines and pods on a Continue Reading →

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